Arts Everyday Living: Spiritual Connections—You, the Artist, and the Work of Art

 

SPIRITUAL CONNECTIONS
YOU, THE ARTIST & THE WORK OF ART

 

 

However, when we see one of Homer’s powerful seascapes such as CANNON ROCK, does it matter what we know of his character or his personal loves and hates—or even what he ate for dinner?

For the completed work of art—the painting as well as the symphony, the dance, the novel, the poem, and the play—always stands independently in its strength, its certainly, its emotion, and its purity.  It may be challenged by time, change of taste, and the constant flux and energy of civilization, past, present, and future. But it perseveres, representing the point where you and the spirit of the artist finally meet.  Sometimes you might need assistance from an expert or interpreter, but ultimately your feelings and judgment decide your relationship to the artist and his work of art.

Excerpt, Who is an Artist?, Through an Artist’s Eyes: Learning to Live Creatively.

 

Winslow Homer, Cannon Rock, 1895, oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Winslow Homer, Cannon Rock, 1895, oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

American artist Winslow Homer (1836-1910) transformed the coast of Prout’s Neck in southern Maine into a work of art creating numerous seascapes of what was essentially his back yard over a period of three decades.  For instance, Cannon Rock above, done in 1895, was located only steps away from his studio. Distinguished by the rock formation in the right lower corner as we face the painting, which appears to be guarding the shore line against an incoming wave.

The above image is used solely for educational purposes.

Start the New Year with a Journey to Art with Through an Artist’s Eyes: Learning to Live Creatively.

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AVAILABLE VIA AMAZON & PAY PAL

 

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